DBA T3 brake rotors
- plus -
DBA XP brake pads

LandCruiser 200
Step-by-Step installation

The LandCruiser 200 comes equipped with very good brakes from the factory, with relatively large 340/354mm front and 345mm rear discs (rotors). Up front it features four-piston calipers, with single-piston at the rear.

But even very good brakes can be improved upon, and particularly if you have a GVM upgrade or are regularly towing, a set of DBA slotted rotors and Extreme Performance pads will give better braking performance under all conditions.

 

The bitterness of poor quality is remembered long after the sweetness of low price has faded from memory.

— Aldo Gucci

LandCruiser 200 Brake Rotors and Pads

Brakes are one of the vital safety components of your vehicle. It might seem to be stating the obvious, yet they are commonly overlooked for regular maintenance, and when replacement is due, quality often takes a back seat to price. This is a bad enough situation on standard vehicles, but once you're running at increased GVM and/or towing, those no-name brake pads that seemed like a bargain, could well be putting you or your family at risk, because their performance will rapidly decline once they start to heat up, which is when you need them most.

I've been running DBA rotors on a Falcon GT for over 5 years, including some track day work. They've proven themselves to be excellent products, so I have no hesitation picking them for the 200 series.

Rotors

I've chosen the same type of rotor I've been running on my GT, the "T3" slotted version of the premium DBA 4000-series discs. These are an Australian-made rotor produced from a high-carbon iron alloy for better performance at high temperatures compared to regular discs. They also have slots to expel brake dust during extended braking and DBA's 'Kangaroo Paw' ventilation system for better cooling. These features all add up to better braking under difficult conditions, such as long downhill runs when loaded or towing, which is exactly what I'm after.

Within the same 4000-series, DBA also produce an un-slotted version if you prefer a factory look but still want improved performance, and also a slotted+cross-drilled version if you want a sportier look.

Another useful feature of the DBA rotors, is that they have three stripes of 'thermographic' paint, which permanently change colour when exposed to various temperatures. By checking these stripes during servicing, you can get an idea of how hot your brakes are getting during regular use. This information can be useful when choosing the ideal pads for the future, depending on how your brakes are being used.

The part numbers of the required rotors vary by year and model, so check the table below to find the correct items for your model of 200 or Lexus LX570/LX450.

Pads

For the pads, I'm installing DBA's new Xtreme Performance (XP) pads, rather than their Standard Performance (SP) versions. The XP pads use a carbon-fibre based friction material which operates effectively at up to 550ºC, which is more than 100º higher than regular pads. The result is better braking performance with less fade during extended braking. If you run heavy and/or tow, then these are the pads to pick. If your 200 is a reasonably standard daily drive, and you don't tow heavy trailers, then the SP pads would also be suitable.

Although the rotor sizes vary between the various 200-series models, the pads have remained the same. The table below lists the part numbers across the range.

 LandCruiser 200 Brake Rotor and Pad Part Numbers

Below is a table linking to the correct parts for each version of the LandCruiser 200 and Lexus LX. Essentially, all versions of the 200-series until the 2015 (DPF) facelift use the same rotors and pads. From the facelift onwards, the VX, Sahara and Lexus have larger (354mm) front rotors. Front and Rear pads and rear rotors remain unchanged.

 Handbrake shoes

Like most modern vehicles, the 200 has a 'drum-in-disc' style handbrake on each rear wheel. This type of handbrake often struggles with heavy vehicles like 4WDs, so it's important to ensure they are well maintained and adjusted correctly. Although the brake shoes on mine still have quite a lot of life left in them, I'll be changing them here for the purpose of the video.

The shoes are relatively inexpensive, and I'd suggest changing them whenever the rear rotors are replaced, to get the best performance from the handbrake.

IMPORTANT

The "Installation" section should not be taken as instructions. It is simply a documenting of the procedure I followed for my own installation. No warranty is provided as to the accuracy of the information, and/or whether it applies in your situation or to your vehicle. If you're not qualified and/or don't have the correct equipment, have the brakes and pads fitted professionally.

  • There are potentially lethal dangers if installation is not completed correctly;
  • There is the potential for severe eye damage if protective eyewear is not worn;
  • There are potentially lethal dangers from the vehicle falling or moving during installation.

If you undertake your own brake rotor/pad installation, you do so entirely at your own risk.

Equipment required

Special Service Tools for handbrake

To change the handbrake shoes correctly, two Special Service Tools (SSTs) are required. They weren't available from Toyota (and I dread to think of the price). So I ordered them from Amayama, and they arrived from Japan in around a week. Amayama are a parallel importer of genuine Toyota (and other Japanese) parts. The entire LandCruiser parts catalogue is available on their website, and you can even search by VIN. The two SSTs required are:

• Return spring tool: 09703-30011

• Hold-down spring driver tool: 09718-00011

Front Brake Rotor and Pad Installation

Click images to enlarge

Step 1: Preparation

  • Jack up the front of the vehicle and support it on chassis stands with the rear wheels chocked, and removed the front wheels;
  • Place the wheels under the chassis on each side as an additional safety precaution.

Step 2: Remove the front rotors and pads

  • Remove the pin retaining clip;
  • Remove the two retaining pins;
  • Remove the anti-rattle clip;
  • Slide the pads out of the caliper. If they won't slide out due to a wear lip on the rotor, you can spread them slightly using the caliper spreading tool;
  • Unbolt the brake line retaining bolt from the steering knuckle;
  • Unbolt the two caliper retaining bolts using a 17mm socket, and remove the caliper. Support it so it's not hanging off the brake line.
  • Remove the brake rotor from the hub. If it won't come off the hub easily, put a 8mm-thread bolt into one or both of the threaded holes on the brake rotor, and wind in the bolt(s) until the rotor comes off.
  • Clean the hub face with a wire brush and/or emery paper to remove protrusions and any rust scale. Pay particular attention to the areas where the threaded holes on the rotor aligned.

WARNING: It's important to wear eye protection whenever you are working with springs and aerosol brake cleaner.

Step 3: Install the new front rotors and pads

  • Clean the faces of the new front rotors, by spraying brake cleaner onto a cloth and wiping the faces. Avoid getting brake cleaner on the painted edges or faces of the rotor;
  • Place a drain pan under the hub/caliper, and loosen the bleed valve on the caliper;
  • Insert the brake caliper spreading tool into the caliper, and wind out until the pistons are pushed completely back into the caliper, ensuring that the brake fluid coming out of the bleed valve is going into the drain pan. Once the pistons are in place, close the bleed valve and tension to 11Nm;
  • Fit the new rotor to the hub;
  • Refit the caliper to the hub. Apply some Loctite 263 to the retaining bolts, and tension them to 99Nm;
  • Re-attach the brake line support bracket to the steering knuckle;
  • Apply some of the included high-temperature grease to the edges of the new brake pads where they will contact the caliper;
  • Slide the new pads into the caliper;
  • Refit the anti-rattle spring;
  • Refit the two retaining pins;
  • Refit the pin retaining spring between the two pins, and clip into the hole in the caliper.

WARNING: It's important to wear safety glasses/eye protection whenever you are working with springs and aerosol brake cleaner.

Step 4: Front-end completion

  • Replace the front wheels and re-tension the wheelnuts, ensuring you tension them in the correct pattern (see image) so the rotor sits flat on the hub ;
  • Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir. Top up with DOT3 fluid if required. I'm not flushing/replacing the brake fluid because it's just been changed as part of a regular service. Toyota recommend changing the fluid every 40,000km;
  • Before driving the vehicle, pump the brakes to get the new pads into position;
  • Test the operation of the brakes at low speed;
  • Bed in the new brake pads/rotors by following the procedure below.

Rear Brake Rotor and Pad Installation

Including handbrake shoe installation

Step 1: Preparation

  • Raise the rear of the vehicle then support it on chassis stands with the front wheels chocked, and remove the rear wheels. Place the rear wheels under the chassis as an additional safety precaution;
  • Ensure the handbrake is not applied.

Step 2: Remove the rear rotors and pads

  • Remove the two caliper-retaining bolts using a 17mm spanner/socket;
  • Unbolt the two caliper retaining bolts using a 17mm spanner/socket, and remove the caliper. Support it so it's not hanging off the brake line;
  • Remove the brake rotor from the hub. If it won't come off the hub easily, put a 8mm-thread bolt into one or both of the threaded holes on the brake rotor, and wind in the bolt(s) until the rotor comes off.

Step 3: Replace the rear handbrake shoes (optional)

Replacing the handbrake shoes safely requires two Special Service Tools. You can get them (and any other genuine parts you require) from Amayama. WARNING: It's important to wear safety glasses/eye protection whenever you are working with springs and aerosol brake cleaner.

  • Remove the return spring by inserting the end of the return spring tool into the hole at the top of the rearmost shoe , and rotating the tool 180 degrees;
  • Using the driver tool, push on the hold down spring cup and turn 90 degrees. You can then remove the cup, hold-down spring and pin;
  • Using the spring release tool again, you can remove the tension spring at the bottom of the shoe, then remove the shoe and the adjuster assembly;
  • Move to the frontmost shoe, and repeat the procedure to remove the hold-down spring, cup and pin. You can then remove the front brake shoe.
  • Clean the backing plate and components;
  • As for the front hub, remove any rust scale with a wire brush or emery paper;
  • Disassemble and clean the adjuster, then apply high-temperature grease to the components and reassemble;
  • Apply high-temperature grease to the anchor block and the raised sections of the backing plate where it contacts the brake shoes;
  • Feed the hold down pin through the backplate, then place the frontmost shoe over the pin. It can be quite fiddly, but you then need to put the spring and the hold down cup over the pin. Align the slot in the cup to the pin, then using the special driver tool, push the cup and spring in until the top of the pin comes through the cup, then twist it 90 degrees;
  • Moving on to the rear shoe. Hold it in position on the back plate, then insert the tension spring and adjuster to join the bottom of the two shoes. It should be oriented so that winding the outside upwards, extends the adjuster;
  • With the rearmost shoe in position, push the hold down pin through the backing plate and the shoe, then install the spring and cup using the same method as for the first shoe;
  • Ensure that the shoe lever is in the correct position between the shoes, then re-install the return spring using the special service tool.

Step 4: Replace the rear pads and rotors

  • Clean both faces of the rotor by spraying a clean rag with brake cleaner and wiping the faces. Do the same for the inside of the handbrake drum;
  • Install the new rotor onto the hub;
  • Rotate it to align the hole on the rotor to the handbrake adjuster, then use a small screwdriver to wind out the adjuster until the handbrake binds on the rotor. Then back the adjuster off approximately 8 notches. You can then make minor adjustments either way to ensure the handbrake isn’t binding, and the lever travel is not excessive;
  • Place a rag over the rotor, then sit the caliper on top;
  • Remove the old brake pads;
  • Slide the mount section off the caliper assembly;
  • Loosen the caliper bleed valve, then insert the spreading tool and push the piston all the way back into the caliper;
  • Retighten the bleed valve, then remove the spreading tool;
  • Apply some high temperature grease to the slide pins, and reassemble the mount onto the caliper, ensuring that the rubber seals locate correctly on the pins;
  • Apply some high temperature grease to the edges of the new pads, then insert them into the caliper;
  • Place the caliper into position and tension the bolts to 95Nm. As with the front calipers, Toyota recommend that you use new bolts;
  • Reinstall the rubber grommet into the handbrake adjustment hole;
  • Repeat this entire procedure on the other side of the vehicle.

Step 5: Completion

  • Replace the rear wheels and re-tension the wheelnuts, ensuring you tension them in the correct pattern (see image) so the rotor sits flat on the hub;
  • Check the brake fluid level in the reservoir. Top up with DOT3 fluid if required. I'm not flushing/replacing the brake fluid because it's just been changed as part of a regular service. Toyota recommend changing the fluid every 40,000km;
  • Before driving the vehicle, pump the brakes to get the new pads into position;
  • Test the operation of the brakes at low speed;
  • Bed in the new brake pads/rotors by following the procedure below.

Bedding in

It is absolutely vital that proper bedding-in procedures are followed after fitting new pads and/or rotors. Not doing so can lead to poor braking performance, 'glazing' and noisy operation.

DBA recommend the following procedure to bed in their rotors and pads:

  • Complete 5-10 'slowdown' runs, applying the brakes with moderate brake pedal effort, and slowing the vehicle from ~50km/h to ~10km/h;
  • Once optimal performance has been achieved, for the next 200km, drive normally but avoid heavy applications of the brakes if possible;
  • Avoid dragging/long term application of the brakes for the first 200km.

Use caution and be aware of other traffic. It's obviously best to do this on a private or quiet road with no other traffic.

Following the above steps will ensure the best life and performance from the new brakes.




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